Levi Strauss & Co. faces challenges like climate change as it returns to the public markets for the first time since the 1980s Levi Strauss & Co. began as a dry goods business in San Francisco in 1853, invented blue jeans 20 years after that, and now, nearly 150 years later, has filed for its second initial public offering. Levi Strauss announced Wednesday afternoon that it will sell at least 36.7 million shares at $17 apiece, raising about $623.3 million at a valuation topping $6.5 billion. The price is higher than Levi’s expected leading up to the IPO, as it had stated a range of $14 to $16. The proceeds will be split between the company and selling shareholders, with the company selling about 9.5 million shares. Shares are expected to begin trading on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol “LEVI” LEVI, +0.17% on Thursday morning. There are 12 underwriters on the deal led by Goldman Sachs & Co. GS, -0.13% , and they have access to another 5.5 million shares that would be sold by the company. Levi’s plans to use the proceeds for “general corporate purposes” including operating expenses, though it could also use some of the money for acquisitions and str...